Top News

Older Americans Are Resuming Their Pre-Pandemic Life To Make-Up For The Lost Time

Older Americans Are Resuming Their Pre-Pandemic Life To Make-Up For The Lost Time

Ever since WHO declared Covid-19 a global pandemic last year, nations across the globe went under lockdown to prevent the spread of the virus. 

During that time, the most vulnerable population, elderly people were strictly advised not to venture out and follow public safety measures. 

Older Americans Are Resuming Their Pre-Pandemic Life To Make-Up For The Lost Time

However, the vaccination drive that started in the US in January, and is currently underway, has successfully inoculated 1 in 5 American adults so far. 

This has allowed seniors to make up for the lost time during the pandemic. 

Older Americans Are Resuming Their Pre-Pandemic Life To Make-Up For The Lost Time

Seniors who are completely vaccinated are making plans to visit their children or grandchildren after a long time. 

All across the nation, seniors are scheduling their medical appointments which were on hold during the pandemic, while some are looking to miles behind them and travel after more than a year. Others are simply catching up with friends and socializing, finally after public health guidelines advised people not to stay too close to each other. 

This has been made possible thanks to the rapid action undertaken by the president, Joe Biden ever since he took charge. The rollout of vaccinations in America have so far inoculated half of the elderly population, citizens over 65 years of age, while 73% of that number have received at least one dose of the Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech shots. Johnson & Johnson also came out with it’s single shot dose earlier this month, adding to the mass vaccination program.

The Center for Drug Control and Prevention (CDC), recognised the efficacy of the antidotes and released guidelines for people who are fully vaccinated. These include indoor gatherings of those who are fully vaccinated and even meeting individuals not vaccinated, as long as they are healthy and the gathering is small. 

The CDC found that both the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines are 90% effective against the Coronavirus in real world application. However, with mortality rates still swelling in the country with an uptick of 550,000  deaths so far, CDC has advised precautions for everyone, such as wearing masks and abiding by social distancing norms in public spaces, avoiding air travel, etc. 

Throughout the country, those fortunate enough to be fully vaccinated are slowly and steadily going back to the ‘old normal’.

A 78-yr old Barry Dym from Massachusetts exclaimed that ‘he could breathe again’ after being fully vaccinated. 

As the Biden administration looked to restore public confidence in the government’s response towards Covid-19, many seniors, who were initially reluctant about the vaccines, changed their mind once scientists started talking over politicians. 

One such citizen is Mardell Reed, 80, who doubted about the efficiency of the vaccines initially, though later changing her mind. The Californian resident in Pasadena is now educating and encouraging others to get vaccinated. She is also looking forward to meeting her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. 

Wilma Jenkins, 82, resident of South Fulton, Georgia, is looking to visit her favourite nightclub to catch a live music show for the first-time since being fully vaccinated in mid-February. She looks forward to flying to San Diego to celebrate her grandson’s retirement from the Navy in late-June. 

The Biden administration directed all 50 states to make every American eligible for the vaccine shots by May 1, a process which is already underway in many states. Some state authorities have also eased public restrictions and removed mask mandates as vaccine supply intensifies throughout the country. 

So far, more than 147 million doses of Covid-19 vaccines have been administered throughout the country, fully vaccinating 53.5 million Americans, more than 16% of the total population. 

Ever since WHO declared Covid-19 a global pandemic last year, nations across the globe went under lockdown to prevent the spread of the virus. 

During that time, the most vulnerable population, elderly people were strictly advised not to venture out and follow public safety measures. 

However, the vaccination drive that started in the US in January, and is currently underway, has successfully inoculated 1 in 5 American adults so far. 

This has allowed seniors to make up for the lost time during the pandemic. 

Seniors who are completely vaccinated are making plans to visit their children or grandchildren after a long time. 

All across the nation, seniors are scheduling their medical appointments which were on hold during the pandemic, while some are looking to miles behind them and travel after more than a year. Others are simply catching up with friends and socializing, finally after public health guidelines advised people not to stay too close to each other. 

This has been made possible thanks to the rapid action undertaken by the president, Joe Biden ever since he took charge. The rollout of vaccinations in America have so far inoculated half of the elderly population, citizens over 65 years of age, while 73% of that number have received at least one dose of the Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech shots. Johnson & Johnson also came out with it’s single shot dose earlier this month, adding to the mass vaccination program.

The Center for Drug Control and Prevention (CDC), recognised the efficacy of the antidotes and released guidelines for people who are fully vaccinated. These include indoor gatherings of those who are fully vaccinated and even meeting individuals not vaccinated, as long as they are healthy and the gathering is small. 

The CDC found that both the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines are 90% effective against the Coronavirus in real world application. However, with mortality rates still swelling in the country with an uptick of 550,000  deaths so far, CDC has advised precautions for everyone, such as wearing masks and abiding by social distancing norms in public spaces, avoiding air travel, etc. 

Throughout the country, those fortunate enough to be fully vaccinated are slowly and steadily going back to the ‘old normal’.

A 78-yr old Barry Dym from Massachusetts exclaimed that ‘he could breathe again’ after being fully vaccinated. 

As the Biden administration looked to restore public confidence in the government’s response towards Covid-19, many seniors, who were initially reluctant about the vaccines, changed their mind once scientists started talking over politicians. 

One such citizen is Mardell Reed, 80, who doubted about the efficiency of the vaccines initially, though later changing her mind. The Californian resident in Pasadena is now educating and encouraging others to get vaccinated. She is also looking forward to meeting her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. 

Wilma Jenkins, 82, resident of South Fulton, Georgia, is looking to visit her favourite nightclub to catch a live music show for the first-time since being fully vaccinated in mid-February. She looks forward to flying to San Diego to celebrate her grandson’s retirement from the Navy in late-June. 

The Biden administration directed all 50 states to make every American eligible for the vaccine shots by May 1, a process which is already underway in many states. Some state authorities have also eased public restrictions and removed mask mandates as vaccine supply intensifies throughout the country. 

So far, more than 147 million doses of Covid-19 vaccines have been administered throughout the country, fully vaccinating 53.5 million Americans, more than 16% of the total population. 

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

To Top