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A Colorado Nurse Turns Covid Vaccination Bottles Into A Piece Of Art

A community health nurse in Colorado collected empty Covid-19 vaccination vials and transformed them into magnificent works of art as homage to her fellow healthcare professionals in the process. Laura Weiss, a retired nurse, said she was approached by Boulder County Health Research in February, asking for vaccinations assistance.

In addition, “I had seen all of these hundreds upon hundreds of empty vaccination vials that were otherwise about to be wasted, and I felt they were just incredibly beautiful, so I wanted to do something important and meaningful with them,” Weiss said. It was possible for Weiss to incorporate the glass Moderna vaccination bottles in his chandelier because he obtained authorization from the manufacturer.

A Colorado Nurse Turns Covid Vaccination Bottles Into A Piece Of Art

Because it’s been such a dark and difficult year for so many people, “I decided I wanted to do more with light,” she said. “It just seemed like it’s been such a dark and terrible year for many people that I liked the concept of bringing a light to this.”

“I believe that light may symbolize optimism and clarity and that it also has the ability to really extend the larger picture and verify perspective,” says the author. After completing a purchase on eBay, the inspiration for creating a chandelier struck. She saw the empty frame on the internet and felt it would make an excellent receptacle for her work.” From a distance, the chandelier seems to be a normal chandelier, but as you approach closer to it, it transforms into something completely different, and your viewpoint is altered,” she said.

A Colorado Nurse Turns Covid Vaccination Bottles Into A Piece Of Art

“It serves as a reminder to me that we may perceive things one way, but when we got closer to it or take a different look at it, our preconceptions can turn out to be completely wrong.”Despite the fact that the artwork does not yet have a permanent home, Weiss said she wants everyone who sees it to realize that it is intended to commemorate healthcare professionals who put their health and lives on the line during the flu epidemic.

“There are many people as well as professions to mention, but especially such nurses who I just witnessed work tirelessly, hours and hours and hours, long periods and days, without a day off, who just have so much passion and skill, and care and kindness,” she said. “There are many people as well as professions to mention, but especially these nurses who I just witnessed work tirelessly,” she continued.

“How can you express your gratitude to someone who goes above and beyond to help others? It’s very motivating.”Weiss, on the other hand, is now giving back and encouraging others. According to Angela Simental, communications & marketing manager for Boulder Public Health, “This light of gratitude art piece is very significant because I believe we’re all feeling this sense of togetherness at this moment as we watch the Delta variant rise.” “We’re overjoyed to have this sort of light in the art to serve as a reminder to us that we can protect ourselves and others by being vaccinated, by being nice to one another, and by acknowledging the contributions of everyone engaged in this.”

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