Health

Mice Are Protected From Sudden Death Caused By Ruptured Blood Vessels-Report

Mice Are Protected From Sudden Death Caused By Ruptured Blood Vessels-Report

A recent study by expert researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that experimental drug therapy support mice from sudden death due to the rupturing of the abdominal blood vessel. 

How It’s Possible?

The study reports that hold the findings of the therapy are available to read online in Biomaterials Advances. The available results put forward the fact that this experimental drug therapy could lead to a successful track in treating abdominal aortic aneurysms.

Mice Are Protected From Sudden Death Caused By Ruptured Blood Vessels

What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm?

An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a condition where the abdominal aorta wall begins to weaken and drastically bulge outwards. The abdominal aorta wall is the major blood vessel in the body that carries blood directly from the heart to the whole body. When the blood vessel gets weak, it results in oozing out blood that may even result in rupturing without any warning symptoms. This health condition is a serious life-threatening emergency that if not treated on time could lead to sudden death. The rupturing condition clearly depends upon the size of the aneurysm. If larger in size, it is more likely to sudden rupture. 

More From PowdersvillePost:

🔵Diabetes Drug To Help Women With High Blood Pressure During Pregnancy

🔵Study Reveals Calcium’s Role In Directing Blood Flow In The Brain

The majority of US people suffer from abdominal aortic aneurysms!

Based on recent research and studies on abdominal aortic aneurysms, nearly 200,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with various stages of abdominal aortic aneurysms or Tripel A. The majority of the patients seem to be senior persons who are chain smokers. About 15,000 deaths were reported this year in the US due to such aneurysms which do not show any symptoms other than catastrophically rupturing suddenly.

An expert panel in the US named the Preventive Services Task Force, which is an independent team reported that inflammation in the major blood vessels results in Triple-A. Most of the attempts to treat this disease failed, and scientists were curiously working to find out a better therapy that works. 

The experimental findings

In the new findings, the experts used nanoparticles to induce anti-inflammatory payloads onto the inflamed blood vessels. The nanoparticle is a melittin protein that develops a complex with RNA and gets deposited in inflamed tissues. Then the protein fragment unpacks the RNA pieces that help in easy entry into the cells. As a result, RNA masks inflammation by co-working with NF-kappaB, a key inflammatory protein. 

The basic version of the nanoparticle was initially created by Co-author Samuel A. Wickline, MD, a professor at the University of South Florida. For the recent study, a highly optimized version of the nanoparticle was used, which was created by first author Huimin Yan, MD, Ph.D., a staff scientist, and Hua Pan, Ph.D., an associate professor of medicine. 

The researchers selected male mice for conducting the experiment. They treated the mice with the developed nanoparticles that significantly enhanced the chance of survival rate up to 85%. The treatment even aided in delaying the rupture that causes sudden death.  

The optimized version of the nanoparticle helps the scientist to develop a therapeutic effect at a safe level with no side effects. Overall, the findings are inspiring, and they suggest this effective therapy to lower the risk of rupture and death from abdominal aortic aneurysms or Tripel A without any side effects. They hope that even more studies on this experimental drug will be able to treat aneurysms in people and reduce the risk of rupture and abrupt death.

References:

🔵Mayo clinic(1998-2022)Abdominal aortic aneurysm (Available Online): https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/abdominal-aortic-aneurysm/symptoms-causes/syc-20350688

🔵Medlineplus(n.d)Abdominal aortic aneurysm(Available Online): https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000162.htm

To Top