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Nez has issued a law to prohibit smoking inside government buildings

Nez has issued a law to prohibit smoking inside government buildings

The chief of the Navajo Nation, the nation’s largest Native American reservation, signed legislation on Saturday that would outlaw smoking inside in a variety of settings, including tribal casinos, under certain circumstances. According to Jonathan Nez, President of the Navajo Nation, the restriction is “a miscarriage of justice.” “Promoting healthy living among our Navajo people has been praised as a significant victory and a brave step in the right direction. Navajo people have embraced the initiative. In order to protect the right of our Navajo people to breathe clean air, we have a fundamental obligation. “He made the declaration in a press release.

Nez has issued a law to prohibit smoking within government buildings

Tribal lawmakers enacted a bill last month that prohibits the smoking of cigarettes, chewing tobacco, electronic cigarettes, and other commercial items in public buildings and workplaces, as well as the establishment of a 25-foot (7.6-meter) buffer zone outside. Unless they are being used as daycare centers, elder care facilities, or corporate offices, the limitation will not apply to ceremonial tobacco use or in people’s homes unless they are being used as such facilities or offices. To take action on the idea, Nez had until Sunday evening to decide whether or not to proceed. The prohibition was established after a 13-year effort by a coalition of organizations to raise awareness of the dangers of secondhand smoking among the general population.

Nez has issued a law to prohibit smoking inside government buildings

Even though masks are required, and questions remain about the virus’s long-term repercussions, campaigners saw an opportunity to redouble their efforts during the coronavirus epidemic. Those who submitted comments to the Navajo Nation Council were unanimous in their support for the move. Many more people cited the risk of lost revenue for the tribal gambling business, which had tried unsuccessfully to gain an exception from the restriction but had been denied.

As part of the COVID-19 safety standards, smoking was prohibited at the tribe’s four casinos, which are located in New Mexico and one in Arizona, east of Flagstaff, according to the tribe. The restriction, however, was not declared permanent until Nez signed the measure into effect. Bills that would have restricted smoking in public places but would have exempted the tribe’s casinos from the ban until their debts were cleared were similarly rejected by Shirley’s replacement, Ben Shelly. To that end, he issued an order forbidding smoking in any of the executive branch offices over which he had authority. It was determined that the judgment did not apply to the whole 27,000 square miles (70,000 square kilometers) reserve, which extends into Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah, but rather to specific sections inside the account. The Navajo Nation’s President, Nez, has issued an executive order prohibiting smoking within government buildings.

The chief of the Navajo Nation, the nation’s largest Native American reservation, signed legislation on Saturday that would outlaw smoking inside in a variety of settings, including tribal casinos, under certain circumstances. According to Jonathan Nez, President of the Navajo Nation, the restriction is “a miscarriage of justice.” “Promoting healthy living among our Navajo people has been praised as a significant victory and a brave step in the right direction. Navajo people have embraced the initiative. 

The restriction, however, was not declared permanent until Nez signed the measure into effect. Saturday. In 2008, the Tribal Council decided to ban smoking and chewing tobacco in public places. Still, then-President Joe Shirley Jr. vetoed the legislation, citing, among other things, worries about casino revenue and the health of tribal members. However, the number of votes necessary for a successful override effort was insufficient.

Bills that would have restricted smoking in public places but would have exempted the tribe’s casinos from the ban until their debts were cleared were similarly rejected by Shirley’s replacement, Ben Shelly. To that end, he issued an order forbidding smoking in any of the executive branch offices over which he had authority. It was determined that the judgment did not apply to the whole 27,000 square miles (70,000 square kilometers) reserve, which extends into Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah, but rather to specific sections inside the reserve.

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