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A Powerful Vitamin That May Treat Advanced Forms Of Fatty Liver Disease

A Powerful Vitamin That May Treat Advanced Forms Of Fatty Liver Disease

Fatty liver disease can occur in the early stages of adulthood, but it’s most commonly found in people over 40 years old. In the United States alone, this condition has reached epidemic proportions in recent years, affecting at least 75 million people.  

How Does It Work?

When your liver gets clogged with fat from poor diet and other factors, it starts to become inflamed and scarred, which in turn prevents it from carrying out its normal functions. This can lead to more serious conditions like cirrhosis, so you need to start looking into fatty liver disease treatments as soon as possible if you think you may be affected by this condition. 

A Powerful Vitamin That May Treat Advanced Forms Of Fatty Liver Disease How

What is it? 

It can be caused by excessive alcohol consumption, obesity, or other factors. In its early stages, the fatty liver disease usually causes no symptoms. However, as the disease progresses, it can lead to inflammation, scarring, and eventually liver failure.  

There is no cure for fatty liver disease, but treatment options are available to manage the condition. One potential treatment option is vitamin E. Vitamin E is an antioxidant that can help protect the liver from damage.  

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What are the common symptoms? 

You may have fatigue, pain in your upper right abdomen, yellowing of your skin or eyes (jaundice), itching, and weight loss. You may develop the fatty liver disease if you’re obese or have diabetes. Fatty liver disease can also be caused by drinking too much alcohol.  

In severe cases, fatty liver disease can lead to cirrhosis or scarring of the liver. In some cases, it’s linked to hepatitis C virus infection. 

Why take vitamin C when you have Fatty Liver Disease? 

Vitamin C is known as a powerful antioxidant. That means it helps to protect your cells from damage. It also helps your body make collagen. That’s a protein that’s important for healing wounds and keeping your skin healthy. Some studies have shown that vitamin C might help lower the risk of developing fatty liver disease. 

It’s also thought to help prevent some of the damage that can happen to your liver if you already have fatty liver disease. If you have fatty liver disease, you might want to talk to your doctor about whether taking vitamin C is right for you. 

How does it work? 

The amino acid cysteine is modified into N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). It’s found in foods like chicken, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts, but you can also take it as a supplement. NAC has powerful antioxidant effects and helps protect cells from damage.  

It also plays a role in detoxification, helping to remove harmful toxins from the body. But how does this relate to fatty liver disease? Fat accumulates in the liver cells, causing fatty liver disease. As your liver tries to deal with all this extra fat, it starts releasing toxic substances into your bloodstream.  

These toxins start building up in other organs, including your brain. What happens next? You start developing diabetes or high blood pressure or high cholesterol – or all three! 

Where can I find it? 

You can find this vitamin in many different places. It is found in food, supplements, and even some medications. This vitamin is also known as niacin, and it can be found in meat, poultry, fish, and fortified foods. Niacin supplements are also available over-the-counter.  

A doctor might prescribe a medication containing niacin if you have liver damage from alcohol abuse or if you have chronic hepatitis C. But make sure to speak with your doctor before starting any new medication.

References:

🟢Cleveland Clinic(2022)Fatty Liver Disease(Available Online): https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/15831-fatty-liver-disease

🟢Webmd(2005-2022)Fatty Liver Disease (Hepatic Steatosis)(Available Online): https://www.webmd.com/hepatitis/fatty-liver-disease

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